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Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Uniwallet, a wallet for a of your altcoins :)

*Uniwallet, a wallet for all of your altcoins, sorry for the mistake
TL;DR: A wallet for all of your altcoins, working with a system of plugins and automatic updates. See bottom link for official thread.
**
More and more altcoins are being made. It's getting confusing on your computer if you - like me - have many different cryptocurrencies wallets installed. Keeping track of your transactions, account balance and many other things between your Bitcoins, Litecoins, Dogecoins, *Coin wallets is getting tiring and messy. It also goes without saying that downloading the whole blockchain each time you want to try new coins is unacceptable, with its size growing more and more each day. Your time is valuable and wasting it by waiting a whole day before using your wallet is intolerable, I think you will agree with me on this one.
Uniwallet solves all of these problems.
**

What is Uniwallet?

Uniwallet is a frontend application currently in developpement that will allow you to manage from one simple interface all of your bitcoins and altcoins transactions, addresses, etc.. Designed to be simple with functions like automatic subwallet update detection (and installation upon confirmation), it will be extremely secure and rely directly on the *coind programs and secure server connexion (see the section below). If you trust your Qt wallet, then you trust Uniwallet, since they use the same software for transactions. Also, as I said, a system of plugins is implemented. That means that anybody who wants to see their coins supported by Uniwallet can just write a plugin for it, which should be easy.
**

How does it works?

Two methods of operation are available, server-side and client-side. Your wallet files are always stored on your computer in specific directories, regardless of which operation mode you choose. A plugin system for adding subwallets to Uniwallet ensure that it's easy to use new currencies, and blockchains are downloaded from the server directly to your wallets if it is your desire (negates the wait time, makes "plug-and-play" wallets).
>Server-side operation: Transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are on a remote server and their use is shared amongst all Uniwallet users. Transactions are made using the Raw Transactions API coupled with RPC, and a secure connexion to the server is used to protect any data. Security is a priority!
>Client-side operation: You specify where on your computer transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are located, and everything related to your transactions is handled localy (without a remote server).
**
Of course, this project is still in its early phase and many things may change with time. Here's the official thread on the bitcointalk forums, and here is the thread that started it all on a lonely Dec. 30. :)
If you are interested in investing, tell me! I may put up donation addresses or a kickstarter.
submitted by MisterGuacamole to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Uniwallet, a wallet for all of your altcoins!

*Uniwallet, a wallet for all of your altcoins, sorry for the mistake
TL;DR: A wallet for all of your altcoins, working with a system of plugins and automatic updates. See bottom link for official thread.
**
More and more altcoins are being made. It's getting confusing on your computer if you - like me - have many different cryptocurrencies wallets installed. Keeping track of your transactions, account balance and many other things between your Bitcoins, Litecoins, Dogecoins, *Coin wallets is getting tiring and messy. It also goes without saying that downloading the whole blockchain each time you want to try new coins is unacceptable, with its size growing more and more each day. Your time is valuable and wasting it by waiting a whole day before using your wallet is intolerable, I think you will agree with me on this one.
Uniwallet solves all of these problems.
**

What is Uniwallet?

Uniwallet is a frontend application currently in developpement that will allow you to manage from one simple interface all of your bitcoins and altcoins transactions, addresses, etc.. Designed to be simple with functions like automatic subwallet update detection (and installation upon confirmation), it will be extremely secure and rely directly on the *coind programs and secure server connexion (see the section below). If you trust your Qt wallet, then you trust Uniwallet, since they use the same software for transactions. Also, as I said, a system of plugins is implemented. That means that anybody who wants to see their coins supported by Uniwallet can just write a plugin for it, which should be easy.
**

How does it works?

Two methods of operation are available, server-side and client-side. Your wallet files are always stored on your computer in specific directories, regardless of which operation mode you choose. A plugin system for adding subwallets to Uniwallet ensure that it's easy to use new currencies, and blockchains are downloaded from the server directly to your wallets if it is your desire (negates the wait time, makes "plug-and-play" wallets).
>Server-side operation: Transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are on a remote server and their use is shared amongst all Uniwallet users. Transactions are made using the Raw Transactions API coupled with RPC, and a secure connexion to the server is used to protect any data. Security is a priority!
>Client-side operation: You specify where on your computer transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are located, and everything related to your transactions is handled localy (without a remote server).
**
Of course, this project is still in its early phase and many things may change with time. Here's the official thread on the bitcointalk forums, and here is the thread that started it all on a lonely Dec. 30. :)
If you are interested in investing, tell me! I may put up donation addresses or a kickstarter.
submitted by MisterGuacamole to QuarkCoin [link] [comments]

UNIWALLET: a single wallet for all of your coins

TL;DR: A wallet for all of your altcoins, working with a system of plugins and automatic updates. See bottom link for official thread.
**
More and more altcoins are being made. It's getting confusing on your computer if you - like me - have many different cryptocurrencies wallets installed. Keeping track of your transactions, account balance and many other things between your Bitcoins, Litecoins, Dogecoins, *Coin wallets is getting tiring and messy. It also goes without saying that downloading the whole blockchain each time you want to try new coins is unacceptable, with its size growing more and more each day. Your time is valuable and wasting it by waiting a whole day before using your wallet is intolerable, I think you will agree with me on this one.
Uniwallet solves all of these problems.
**

What is Uniwallet?

Uniwallet is a frontend application currently in developpement that will allow you to manage from one simple interface all of your bitcoins and altcoins transactions, addresses, etc.. Designed to be simple with functions like automatic subwallet update detection (and installation upon confirmation), it will be extremely secure and rely directly on the *coind programs and secure server connexion (see the section below). If you trust your Qt wallet, then you trust Uniwallet, since they use the same software for transactions. Also, as I said, a system of plugins is implemented. That means that anybody who wants to see their coins supported by Uniwallet can just write a plugin for it, which should be easy.
**

How does it works?

Two methods of operation are available, server-side and client-side. Your wallet files are always stored on your computer in specific directories, regardless of which operation mode you choose. A plugin system for adding subwallets to Uniwallet ensure that it's easy to use new currencies, and blockchains are downloaded from the server directly to your wallets if it is your desire (negates the wait time, makes "plug-and-play" wallets).
>Server-side operation: Transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are on a remote server and their use is shared amongst all Uniwallet users. Transactions are made using the Raw Transactions API coupled with RPC, and a secure connexion to the server is used to protect any data. Security is a priority!
>Client-side operation: You specify where on your computer transaction softwares (bitcoind, litecoind, *coind) are located, and everything related to your transactions is handled localy (without a remote server).
**
Of course, this project is still in its early phase and many things may change with time. Here's the official thread on the bitcointalk forums, and here is the thread that started it all on a lonely Dec. 30. :)
If you are interested in investing, tell me! I may put up donation addresses or a kickstarter.
submitted by MisterGuacamole to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

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